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20121219
20121219
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million pe
hole causing traffic problems in the city of clayton. >> one lane over eight miles is just reopened after being closed last night. the contra costa county public works department discovered this sink hole near morgan territory road. crews working to stabilize the surface expected to take up to a week to fix. >> they have steel plates coming to place over roads. we're looking at getting them about 20 feet long to span the cavity. and... we're hopeful that that would mitigate the immediate hazard until where he have time to get a contractor on word. >> now, local traffic is allowed to use thised room heavy vehicles are being rerouted. >> westfield shopping sent jer back open today. and there is a flue fire, the fire department says it broke out in a restaurant just after 8:30. the westfield theater evacuated and no word yet on a cause of the fire. >> well, pg&e still making w pipeline explosion. one of them is separating the gas and electric operations. >> gas operations will be head quarters in san ramone. abc 7 news was there for an update. >> pg&e consolidating gas controls into on
of the bill, a health clinic in the city of sunrise, florida, as the william "bill" kling v.a. clinic. william passed away sadly on august 6 at age 84. my deepest appreciation goes out to the committee on veterans' affairs and chairman miller who is a great friend from the state of florida, for supporting this effort and helping it to come to the floor. bill was a member of our greatest generation of americans, serving our nation in the navy during world war ii. but this was far from over when he returned from war. in fact, it was just beginning. bill claims -- became our strongest advocate and helping generations of veterans as they returned to civilian life. he worked tirelessly to make sure our veterans were getting the benefits they deserved, from education to quality health care through our v.a. system. i'm sure our florida colleagues will tell you that bill was a force to be reckoned with, pushing the urgency of the issue at hand. i know he will be sorely missed. in particular, my thoughts and prayers goes out to bill's family, including his daughter. i had the distinct pleasure, mr. spe
, no medicine, a bombed out hospital, and a lot of very, very desperate civilians in syria's largest city. it was after filing that devastating report that richard engel and his team were captured. >> we were driving in syria, about five days ago in what we thought was a rebel-controlled area. we were with some of the rebels. and as we were moving down the road, a group of gunmen just literally jumped out of the trees and bushes on the side of the road. there were probably 15 gunmen. they were wearing ski masks. they were heavily armed. they dragged us out of the car. they had a container truck positioned, waiting by the side of the road. they put us into that container truck. we were with some gunmen, some rebels who were escorting us. they executed one of them on the spot. then they took us to a series of safe houses and interrogation places, and they kept us blindfolded, bound. we weren't physically beaten or tortured. it was a lot of psychological torture, threats of being killed. they made us choose which one of us would be shot first. and when we refused, there were mock shootings.
city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seemslike that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly garding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think we need to ban guns. i think we need to find the right balance. it may not just be the guns. it might also
mayor of kansas city, missouri, but he's also an ordained methodist pastor. pastor cleaver is frequently called upon for words to deliver at my whip meeting on thursday mornings. i have said they are the highlight of our week, in many respects. emanuel cleaver speaks to us about humanity, about caring, about respecting each of our colleagues on either side of the aisle, of respecting and honoring our responsibilities to our fellow citizens. in short, emanuel cleaver on a weekly basis appeals to the best that is within us, to reflect the best that is america. emanuel cleaver will shortly be succeeded as president of the c.b.c. by marcia fudge from ohio. like emanuel cleaver, a leader of conscience, a leader of great ability and a leader who will reach out to all of us as well and continue to lead this organization that we know is the conscience of the congress. as we talk about creating jobs, as we talk about caring for one another, as we talk about makinging life better for all americans, there is no more compelling voice than the congressional black caucus towards that end. and there ha
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
has made a request. yes, is it a hefty $60 billion? but look at who was hit -- a big city that's the heart -- one of the heartbeats of america: new york. and a little community like crisfield. now matter h.j. you live in -- but no matter whether you live in new york city or in crisfield, maryland, you deserve the help of your government. and i say to my colleagues, let's think of the people we were sent here to represent. we weren't sent here to represent a bottom line. we were here to represent people. and i would hope that we would put into place -- that we would pass the president's request. we have great policies that were arrived at. and if you really want to honor senator inouye, let's honor the way his own code of conduct -- a gentle way, a civil way, a consensus builder, a bipartisan builder, and a worker to move this bill. senator inouye chaired the full committee on aeption pros these -- on appropriations these last couple of years. his own staff shared a story with me. and it is relative with me here. he said, i chair the defense committee -- subcommittee,ances and t
. elect tri-city costs in the next 15 years. if you manufacture and establish the united states, you take advantage of the many trade agreements the united states has with the countries. whether it's a japanese cut me, thai company can chinese company manufactures in the united states, employing good american workers. .. >> the key is having the right set of advisors from investment bankers to accounting firms and law firms and pr firms and management consulting firms. >> we will leave it there. think you all for coming. think everyone. [applause] i was just going to thank everyone at asia society.org. thank you both for being here. it has been a great pleasure. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about the greatest suffering. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i have intentness that went up and told me when someone had their own agenda. >> i think that they serve as a window on the path to past what was going on with american women. >> she b
break fast how as an officer he would spend his weekends in the great city of chicago, the knickerbocker hotel. and he said he would head to the hospital, and he talked one of his fellow hawaiians, whose face had been burned off to downhim on a trip to chicago. the map was embarrassed and didn't think anyone would want a talk to him. but when danny inouye knew he was coming to chicago, he prepared place for them to stop and every one of them greeted senator inouye and his friend in a warm fashion. the story goes on from there and i won't go into the details, but he was a man who was always looking to help someone else. he told how this man who had been so brutally injured in the war, returned to hawaii and raised a family and was dan inouye's friend for life, as so many of us were. i think back as well about senator robert c. byrd's funeral in west virginia. mr. president, it was one of the hottest days i can remember. we were up there just baking in the sun at this memorial service for robert c. byrd. and i had intentionally picked a seat right next to danny inouye. i was taking off my
with a twinkle in his eyes. i also remember in the community or the city of -- in the russian far east. we were at a hotel and i would say that this hotel, if there are any hotels in regard to the russian far east this one had to be won on the last of the list and as we went into our rooms i discovered that my dad was a wooden frame and then just straps, no mattress and then one blanket and no pillow. i thought being the junior member of this codel, this was something that they assigned to me so i went down the hall with my special key in hand and my special i.d. and that part of the world, that is what you do. i knocked on danny store and he said how can i be of service to you dear friend? i said, i would just like to look at your accommodations, thinking of course he would have a bed and there was a wooden bed with the same kind of accommodations and no mattress and just one blanket. and he said, why are you interested in that bed? i said well, i thought being the junior member and having the same thing, that you know something might be better in your quarters. he got a big kick out of that a
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)